Ideas & Exposition Modules

 

Ideas & Exposition Modules

RC4’s curriculum includes academic writing modules titled “Ideas and Exposition”. The I&E modules are offered by the Centre for English Language Communication (CELC).

  1. Completing the Qualifying English Test (QET) is a pre-requisite for reading I&E modules.
    Students who obtain Band 1 will have to take ES1000 followed by ES1103
    Students who obtain Band 2 will have to take ES1103

    Students who obtain Band 3 are exempted from these English modules and can read I&E I
  2. Students need to read and pass I&E I before reading I&E II.
  3. Students are awarded letter grades for these modules, with S/U Option.
  4. View IE timetable

Ideas and Exposition I for Semester 1 AY2019/2020

UTW1001B What is a Nation? Texts, Images and National Identity

National identity is an integral part of who we are. Yet, it remains a highly disputed concept. This course will problematize key theoretical debates by exploring Singapore’s national identity and examining how Singapore and regional countries have been shaped by interaction with colonialism and beyond. Drawing on a Multimodal Discourse Analysis (MDA), which allows us to analyse image and text interactions, we explore how national icons are created in public media and ask the question of how national identity still remains a powerful and emotional entity that rallies or divides people of different ethnicities, religious, cultural and socio-economic backgrounds.

UTW1001B

UTW1001C At the Edges of the Law: Ethics, Morality and Society

What should be the reach of the arms of the law? Most find it unproblematic if a state punishes distributors of child pornography; but what if the punitive muscle of the state is also used to enforce public morality? Can the law intrude on the private lives of citizens? Should euthanasia be legal? In this module we shall be putting these and other pressing issues that are at the centre of political debate to critical enquiry. This module will appeal to students interested in the study of applied ethics, the criminal law, public policy and socio-political theory.

UTW1001C

UTW1001N Public Persona and Self-presentation

Public persona is a fundamental yet unarticulated aspect of persuasion in spoken discourse. In this course, students will explore and examine speakers' public persona with a focus on interactional and social roles in performed presentations before a public audience. What does it mean to perform a public persona? How is public persona shaped, strengthened, or attenuated? Is there such a thing as an "authentic" public persona? In seminar-type classes and, subsequently, in writing assignments, students will analyse verbal and nonverbal performance of a speaker or speakers in mediated and/or non-mediated contexts, and develop informed views of their public persona.

UTW1001N

UTW1001P Heroes

This module will explore the development and transformation of heroic figures across time and cultures, how people have reacted to these figures, and how these figures have been adapted. Students will engage with multiple versions of the "hero," both male and female, from a variety of media (literature, film, television, graphic novel) and scholarly literature on the subject as a means to develop critical writing skills. Some questions we will ask include: What defines a heroic character? What do a society's heroes reflect about its own values? What are the dangers of uncritical acceptance of heroes?

UTW1001P

UTW1001S Women in Film

Are films mere entertainment and the images that they project harmless in their effect on society? When we watch a film, we enter a world where certain values and beliefs are communicated. These messages can either support or challenge the prevailing ideas that exist in society. Since the 1970s, and to the present, images of women in films have been the site of ideological struggle. This course introduces you to the debates surrounding the representation of women in film, and invites you to formulate perspectives that engage with the issues raised as you critically analyze these images in selected viewings.

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UTW1001W The Online Politician: The Use of Social Media in Political Communication

Using social media as a political battleground during the 2011 General Election changed Singapore’s political landscape indelibly. It exemplified an emerging trend: the increasing use of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat by politicians to gain greater political support and popularity. In fact, using social media for political communication has gone viral in Singapore, Asia-Pacific and beyond. This module explores the dynamics of social media in political communication, with a focus on Singapore, as well as the United States as case studies. Students will analyse the impact of conventional means of political communication as opposed to those using social media.

UTW1001W

UTW1001Z: Colour: Theory, Meaning and Practice

Colour has fascinated humans for millennia, yet it is poorly understood. What is the symbolic meaning of colours across cultures? How do colours impact our psychological well-being and our consumer choices? From the earth pigments of the prehistoric painters, to the synthetic colours of the Impressionists, colour technology has developed to meet new communication and expression needs and in doing so, a whole repertoire of meanings has evolved. In this module, students will explore scholarly and popular texts from a range of disciplines including visual arts, fashion, psychology, marketing and anthropology to investigate the theory, meaning and practices of colour.

UTW1001Z

Ideas and Exposition II for Semester 1 AY2019/2020

UTW2001H Risk and Popular Culture

We live in a time characterized by an intensified awareness of risk. Our perception of risk, whether related to new technology or social activity, is greatly influenced by how mass media represents it. Taking prominent social theories of risk as its critical frame of reference, this course will explore the role of news, television shows, popular fiction and films in shaping public opinion on, and responses to, potential and presumed threats. These range from environmental pollution, pathogens and medical procedures to terrorism, cybercrime, immigration/immigrants and un(der)employment. Case studies may include Fukushima, Chernobyl and the Y2K phenomenon.

UTW2001H

UTW2001J Blood, Death and Desire, Interpreting the Vampire

Vampire literature has undergone a twenty-first Century resuscitation, evident in novels such as Twilight and television series including The Vampire Diaries and True Blood. But how similar are these vampires to the traditional vampire in Western and other cultures? In this module you will explore different explanations for the role/function of the Vampire and have the opportunity to research manifestations of the Vampire across cultures, genres and historical periods. You will review different research methodologies, and compile a list of terms and ideas that enable you to participate in the conversation to understand the ongoing fascination with the Vampire.

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UTW2001M Sport and Socialization

Involvement in professional and amateur sports through competition, ludic activity or spectatorship is a social experience and thus connected to larger social and cultural formations. Students will engage with sociological research and develop their own critical positions grounded within functionalist, interactionist or critical theory frameworks in one of the three areas: (1) Socialization into sport; what factors may influence initiation and continuation? (2) Socialization out of sport; in particular what are the causes and effects of burnout or retirement in competitive sport? (3) Socialization through sport; how are dimensions of identity (embodiment, gender, race, social class) developed?

UTW2001M

UTW2001Q What's in a Word? Meaning Across Cultures

It is often assumed that there is a common understanding of what specific words mean. However, can one assume a common understanding across cultures of words describing colour, such as ‘red’ or ‘maroon,’ or emotion, such as ‘happiness,’ ‘pleasure,’ or ‘disgust’? Are forms of address, such as nicknames, or interjections, such as ‘damn’ or the ‘F’ word, used in similar ways across cultures? Are there differences between the ways that speakers of different varieties of English understand the meanings of such words? This module explores how meaning is culture-bound, and helps students understand cultural differences in the choice and use of words.

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UTW2001R Discourse, Citizenship, and Society

Citizens participate in society through discourse -- talk and texts. How citizens speak and write about social issues in face-to-face and online platforms therefore warrant careful reflection. This course aims to enable students to examine how individuals enact their citizenship through language and other symbols. Students will investigate how citizens mobilize language, voice, body and other resources to deal with issues pertaining to social differences, processes of exclusion, and participation in local, regional and global contexts, among others. By the end of the module, the students should be able to develop critical awareness of how civic discourse shapes public issues.

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